Oper strip

Oper strip is a single-use product made of breathable, nonwoven polyamide/polyester fabric, with high tensile strength and coated with latex-free hypoallergenic acrylic adhesive that is treated by UV rays. The adhesive is protected by silicone paper. It is a sterile product. It is sterilised with ethylene oxide.
THERAPEUTIC PURPOSE
Suture strip designed to reinforce traditional sutures, or act as a substitute once these are removed, used in superficial skin or moderately deep cuts, lacerations and surgical incisions, by facilitating healing and providing stability to the wound.
Advantages over stitches include suture strips that are painless, easy to apply and remove, and reduce the risk of infection. Aesthetic results are similar to those obtained with stitches.
MATERIALS
  • Strip:
    Nonwoven polyester and polyamide fabric.
  • Adhesive:
    Hypoallergenic acrylic adhesive.
“Latex-free product”

INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE
  • Clean and disinfect the wound and the area around it properly.
  • Dry the wound and the area around it.
  • Ensure that there are no foreign objects in the wound.
  • With clean hands, remove the protective pouch and take out a suture strip.
  • When only one suture strip is used, join together the edges of the wound carefully and place the strip perpendicular to the cut.
  • Place the first strip in the centre of the wound.
  • To do so, place one side of the suture strip on one side of the wound and, without stretching it, after joining together the edges of the wound, stick the other part of the strip on the opposite side.
  • Then place the necessary strips parallel to the first one to cover the entire wound.
  • Place the strips by leaving a 2 mm to 5 mm space between them, depending on the depth and size of the wound, with the most common distance between strips being 2 mm or 3 mm.
  • To reduce tension on the wound, you can place a strip perpendicular to each side of the set of adhesive strips which cover the cut.
  • No specific monitoring is required after removing the strips when the wound has healed, although the process should be checked visually.
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